Which legal mp3 sites do you use?

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kennz

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Which sites do others use to get legal mp3 etc? Obviously not itunes which in my opinion is extortion. I use soundike very good and inexpensive.
Cheers Ken.
 

kornchild2002

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I use the iTunes Store only when they offer content in the iTunes Plus format (I don't like dealing with DRM) or the artist/band releases their content as an iTunes only EP/single. For example, Head (the former guitarist from Korn) released his first single exclusively through iTunes at the beginning of July. So I spent the $0.99 on it even though it was the 128kbps DRM version. I have lately been turning to Amazon's mp3 store though due to the insane amount of Pepsi points that I have. Most of the time, I can get new singles/songs for free using my Pepsi points. I have yet to purchase an mp3 through Amazon's store but I might in the future whenever my stash of points run out.

I just want to clear things up though: Soundike is NOT legal. It is a website in which the admins and servers are located in Russia or some other country whose media laws are loose. They do not pay royalties to the copyright owners (either the artists or the record companies) and they rip people off. Most of the time their music comes from illegal torrent uploads. They then turn around and charge people about $1.40 for an album. That is how some of those albums show up early on websites like that. They are also charging for content that should be free. The latest Nine Inch Nails album, The Slip, can be downloaded for free in lossless formats (or various lossy formats) directly from Trent's website. Soundike is charging people for what should be free. Just remember that any site who charges less than $0.50 for downloads is illegal. There was a similar site called allofmp3 that was eventually shut down by the RIAA, U.S. government, and the Russian government. These types of websites pop up everyday and it is just another way for some pirates to trick people into giving them money.

Be smart, don't give your money to websites like that. It is strange that you consider the iTunes Store to be extortion when in reality Soundike is actually committing that act, the iTunes Store isn't. You should use legal services such as the Amazon mp3 store, eMusic, the iTunes Store, or Napster's new DRM-free store.
 

GregMac1213

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kornchild2002 said:
I use the iTunes Store only when they offer content in the iTunes Plus format (I don't like dealing with DRM) or the artist/band releases their content as an iTunes only EP/single.
Same here. If the album is not available in iTunes Plus, I look for it at (in order) eMusic and Amazon.
 

bdb

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I've been using eMusic of and on for years, and have purchased a couple of thousand songs from them. I use the $20/month plans, which works out to about 27¢ a song (it used to be 20¢/song). They don't have the popular music that is played on the radio, but on the other hand my money isn't going to labels that don't sue their customers.

I've purchased several albums from Amazon, too. The quality is excellent (256kbps LAME 3.97 MP3), and the price is usually less than iTunes.

I've purchased a bit from iTunes, only when the other choices are just really bad. There are a few cases where import albums are sold for regular price on iTunes, and its about 1/3 the price of pricey imports. They're usually overpriced, though, in an odd format that isn't ubiquitously supported, and usually DRMed, so I typically don't even bother checking there. Their free songs used to be really good ( and I ended up purchasing albums from those artists several times, though not on iTunes); now their free songs are just vapid radio-sounding rubbish.
 

urbanlegend

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i use:
- itunes for itunes plus tracks/albums only
- emusic
- zunior.com

and i'm awaiting amazon mp3's arrival in the great white north.

john
 

jsmusicbox

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Thanks for the info..It's usually hard for me to find legal mp3 sites. I usually use iTunes just because it's convenient and well-organized and reliable.

-jenna
 

kennz

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Yeah i get what you are saying. But itunes here in the uk and europe is a rip off big time! You pay 99c US we pay 79p almost double how can this be right. It comes from the same server from the same artist etc so why do we pay so much more?

Regards Ken.
 

kornchild2002

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kennz said:
Yeah i get what you are saying. But itunes here in the uk and europe is a rip off big time! You pay 99c US we pay 79p almost double how can this be right. It comes from the same server from the same artist etc so why do we pay so much more?

Regards Ken.
Then don't use it. However, one should not turn to illegal methods simply because the iTunes Store is high in price. The high price is there though as Apple must pay many fees to distribute media via downloads in the UK. That is also one of the reasons why the Canadian iTunes Store has higher prices.
 

Germansuplex

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I buy high-profile albums from artists I like on CD. Old or new albums, it doesn't matter. If I've discovered somethign I want badly, I buy it on CD.

I browse record stores for used CD's. They are cheap and often have rare or out of print CD's for next to nothing.

I use Amazon.

I use eMusic (being able to re-download at any time is nice).

I use iTunes (sometimes I just buy compulsively from the iPhone or on my laptop at work.)
 

kennz

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That is saying that here in the UK it costs more to do exactly the same as in the US.
We are ripped off by many in this country but does not make it right. The costs to distribute is the same the world over, internet anyone?
I would use Amazon but it is not available in the UK.
It is no supprise that there is still alot of illegal downloading here because of the practices of the few who offer downloads with an extrotionantly high fee.
A good example 79p per track, average album eleven songs = 8. 69.
I can buy the disc from play or cd wow for 7 pounds , uncompressed music and all the packaging.
I am not advocating illegal! This is just me opening a debate and asking why so much when it costs less for more if you see.
Regards Ken.
 

kornchild2002

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kennz said:
That is saying that here in the UK it costs more to do exactly the same as in the US.
We are ripped off by many in this country but does not make it right. The costs to distribute is the same the world over, internet anyone?
You are forgetting that different countries have different laws. Online distribution does not mean that costs will be flat worldwide. That is like saying that all cars use unleaded gasoline so that means that gas should have a flat cost worldwide. Music prices are controlled record company agreements which vary from country to country. So go complain to the record companies.

You can also think about it this way: I pay about $5.25 for an iced, venti, quad white chocolate moca at Starbucks here where I live. I can travel 4 hours to a bigger city located north of me in the same state and pay $4.75 for the same thing. Why? Operating costs are more in the city I live in than the city north of me. I imagine it has to do something with the city's population and the amount of business the Starbucks down here gets. Are they ripping me off? Not at all.

So go talk to the record companies if you want cheaper prices. Apple is one online distribution method that is way too controlled by the record companies. That is a problem that Apple acknowledged by becoming one of the first legal online distribution methods back in 2003. They set the standard by which everyone else goes by today with some slight modifications. They are also extremely popular and the record companies like to charge more for using popular services. Apple has fought back against the record companies a couple of times as, in the U.S., they wanted to charge about $2.50 for each popular radio single on an album, $1.50 for other popular songs, $0.99 for the other songs, and not allow users to download entire albums at a discount. In the U.S., Amazon normally charged $0.88 per song but they used Apple's foundation when negotiating with the record companies.

Everything comes down to the record companies and what they want. In all seriousness, if they don't like the way any distribution company is doing business, they can pull their material. I know that you are not advocating illegal distribution methods but using the site in your original post is illegal. To me, that is like saying that "I robbed a bank today and ran out with $50,000. It is great as the U.S. government keeps robbing me so I turned to bank robbing. I am not advocating it though, I just do it." I know that bank robbing is not on the same level as steeling music but still, you get the point.
 

Code Monkey

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kornchild2002 said:
You are forgetting that different countries have different laws.
I believe you forgot that when you called these sites illegal above ;)

Even allofmp3.com, for all the smoke and bluster the politicians made about it, was never found to have broken a single misdemeanor and, though under a different name, the site administrators and owners are doing the exact same thing today... legally. At least as of now, Russia's promises to bring their laws more in line with the E.U. and U.S.A. seem to be political speak with no actual results.

You may not agree with other countries not giving two rat farts about whether an American music label is happy with how "their" music is distributed in other countries, you may not agree that private citisens in countries are able to "import" music from these other countries without risk of penalty, but it's all very legal for the very same reason I quoted from you. I'm not saying it's right, right and wrong have nothing to do with legal and illegal, but panning non-approved online music retailers by essentially making the argument that since they're not following U.S./E.U. laws what they're doing is illegal and then turning around and defending the price fixing and barriers to international music distribution under the guise that we have to live with that because different countries have different laws is one amazing act of hypocrisy.
 

kornchild2002

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Code Monkey said:
I believe you forgot that when you called these sites illegal above ;)

Even allofmp3.com, for all the smoke and bluster the politicians made about it, was never found to have broken a single misdemeanor and, though under a different name, the site administrators and owners are doing the exact same thing today... legally. At least as of now, Russia's promises to bring their laws more in line with the E.U. and U.S.A. seem to be political speak with no actual results.
That is the thing though. On paper, Russia is working to line itself up more with Europe and the U.S. What Russia practices is another story though but on paper, allofmp3 was illegal and so are all those clones and newer versions. The Russian government won't do anything until the RIAA and U.S. government step in and say something though. It reminds me a lot of underage drinking in Mexico. Mexico's legal drinking age is 18 but they don't really enforce that. On paper they do but their practice is a whole other story. Now, they will enforce that law if someone is being dumb (namely a U.S. tourist) and the Federales will take their money or throw them in jail. So they might enforce the drinking age law here and there but it is mainly just to look good on paper.

Those sites are still illegal whether they are operational or not. They could move their base of operations to a different country with even looser laws but it would still be illegal for a resident of the U.S., Canada, UK, and many other European nations to download from said site. The site would only be legal in their country of operation.
 

Code Monkey

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kornchild2002 said:
What Russia practices is another story though but on paper, allofmp3 was illegal and so are all those clones and newer versions.
See, that's what you're missing: they took them to court, they were acquitted of everything. Legal is not defined by what the U.S. thinks, what some Russian diplomat angling for WTO status, or, music gods help us in this case, a random forum poster believes, but what the laws and the courts interpreting those laws say.

They are legal, period. No amount of claims from people who disagree with them on principle changes that they have legal precedent on top of the fact that no one can point to a *single* law the stores are breaking.

If/when the law itself changes they may become illegal (depending on how the law changes and how the sites react) but rest assured they are doing absolutely nothing illegal at all no matter how many times you want to claim they are.

You are being an obstinate hypocrite, plain and simple. When you can figure out how the actual laws on the books and tested legal precedent in the courts mean the opposite of what they mean, please feel free to claim they are illegal, until then, you are flat out wrong.
 
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pohatu771

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AllofMP3 operated on a licence similar to the licence a radio station uses. In Russia, they were entirely legal. What was illegal was for non-Russians to download the music.
 

Code Monkey

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pohatu771 said:
AllofMP3 operated on a licence similar to the licence a radio station uses. In Russia, they were entirely legal. What was illegal was for non-Russians to download the music.
Under what statute?

Seriously, people tell themselves it's illegal because surely it seems like it must be so, but I am aware of no state or federal law that says I can't buy music from other countries. In fact, U.S. import law is pretty explicit that I am allowed to buy music for personal use from other countries. The same law that let's me buy Japanese CDs for $30-$40 each (OUCH!) without worrying about customs tarriffs is the same law that lets someone else buy music from these sites. The law doesn't say one thing for fully approved methods of buying music and something else for other ways of buying music. The law basically makes the assumption that if it is legal for that retailer to sell that music to you in their country, it is legal for you to bring that music into this country.

I'm not defending what they're doing, but I really hate that people are so sheep like in regards to assuming what is legal or illegal.

Admittedly, this is a grey area because it has been suggested that it may not have been exactly legal for people outside of Russia to buy from them, but there are no statutes against it explicitly, and it's certainly never been tested in a court, as such, it is safe to assume that it's at least not illegal assuming you can find a way to pay for it (many U.S. credit card companies block payments to these sites). Of course, it's also not outside the realm of belief that civil charges might be brought against you assuming they could possibly prove you were a customer, but since they can't, this is all a lot of hand wringing for people who routinely confuse the difference between something that is legal/illegal and something that might possibly allow someone with a civil claim to charge you money for allegedly damaging them in some way.
 

kennz

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I have to say that you are wrong in your quote that " it is illegal to use these sites" it is not and if it were then do you not think that these greedy labels would do more!

The simple answer is that it easier to claim that it is " illegal". No evidence so no crime until proven guilty.

Also i stated the fact regarding the cost of cd albums verses downloads, these are produced by the same corperations and of coarse without packaging , printing, transportation or retail. How does that stack up.

As for it only being legal to download from the site if it is situated in your country? What are you on man, as before interweb anyone!

This is simple they think they have found a new way to " monitize" music and sqeeze more than is fair, you need to stop being an appoligist for these greedy corps . They have not got a clue regarding the net this has been proven time and time again, late into it then missed opertunities galore.

A fair price and tell you what, they will rake it in!
 

kornchild2002

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No, it is completely illegal for residents outside of Russia to use these types of websites. The record companies (RIAA), U.S. Government, and Russian Government shut down allofmp3 and I am sure the Russian Government can shut down these other clone websites if the U.S. pushed them enough.

OK, you keep asking for evidence. How about we ask you for evidence that the sites are legal to download from in the U.S. I already know that allofmp3 was illegal as it was shut down. Otherwise it would still be up operating today.

The internet is not a universal medium. Yes, I can download files from around the world but those files have certain legal issues in the country they were posted under and the country I am downloading them in. Take Canada as an example. It is perfectly legal for someone to post their music collection online and to download their music collection as long as they aren't sharing their music. So someone can pretty much post anything on the internet in Canada as long as it is for personal use. In Canada, they see the internet as being just another format similar to CD-Rs or DVD-Rs. That is not the same in the U.S. I cannot post my music collection online even if I am the only one planning on using it. Now I can setup a network storage system so that I can download the songs off of my computer onto any device/computer that I want but I cannot put them up on the internet.

In order for a website to be legal in the U.S., they must abide by certain rules, laws, and must work closely with the RIAA and record companies. Those Russian websites are not legal in the U.S. but we can still access them. This is similar to being able to access movies online through torrent clients. I believe that is legal in Russia so it must be legal in the U.S. too if I download it from Russia. Wrong!

I know that you are in the UK but you can basically apply the same laws. I myself am not apologizing for the record companies as I know what their intentions are. That is why I purchased the CDs. In fact, last Tuesday I purchased Scars On Broadway's new album for only $7.99 and it came with a bonus DVD. The same album was $9.99 on iTunes and about the same price on Amazon's digital distribution system. So I purchase the CDs themselves and only use iTunes to purchase the iTunes exclusive EPs/singles or if the albums are much cheaper. There are times when the iTunes Store has albums for sale about $4-5 cheaper than Best Buy so I will turn to them for that. So I am not advocating what the record companies are doing.

I am just saying that these sites are in fact illegal outside of the country where they operate from (Russia). Allofmp3 was shut down as a result of that and from pressure from both the U.S. Government and RIAA. The question of being fair or not doesn't matter when it comes to the iTunes Store. Your definition of fair is different from mine and from everyone elses. I think that $0.99 a track and $9.99 is more than fair enough. The record companies in the UK think that the increased prices are fair. You think that paying $0.05 a track and not giving any money to the artists is fair.
 
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