• iLounge and the Discussion Forums are read by people in countries all over the world. The legality of DVD-to-iPod ripping will vary based on your country of residence. iLounge does not in any way endorse violation of the valid rights of copyright holders, and strongly recommends that you consult your country's copyright and fair use laws before copying any video content.

Video editing?

GO TO ADMIN PANEL > ADD-ONS AND INSTALL VERTIFORO SIDEBAR TO SEE FORUMS AND SIDEBAR

bootsie

New member
Joined
Jul 1, 2006
Messages
87
Points
0
Age
34
Location
Utah
I am looking for a free software program for when I encode a season of a TV show for my iPhone. I want to be able to cut out and rename the different episodes so that I can pick which one I want to watch.

Any programs that would work for this?

Also, it was recommended that I encode my videos in 640x480, but that is the wrong aspect ratio, so why would I do that (I understand for archive purposes, but I am mostly using them for the iPhone so I want them to be right for that) I want them to take up the whole screen on the iPhone.
 
Joined
Nov 15, 2004
Messages
13,238
Points
36
Age
49
Location
Toronto, Canada
Website
www.ilounge.com
What are you encoding the TV Shows from? If you're ripping them from DVD, you should be able to extract the individual episodes as separate files... They're normally stored on different tracks on the DVD.

That having been said, MPEG Streamclip is a free application that should do what you want.

As for encoding the TV Shows, what aspect ratio are they originally in? A 4:3 TV Show (standard TV content) is going to basically be 640x480 off the source (DVD or broadcast), while a 16:9 TV Show (ie, HDTV/widescreen content) will likely be anamorphically 854x480. From a DVD, the original resolution is 720x480 regardless, and anamorphic encoding is used to stretch or reduce as necessary.

The problem is that the iPhone screen has a 1.5:1 aspect ratio. This is right in between the 1.33:1 (4:3) of standard TV content, and the 1.78:1 (16:9) of widescreen TV content, so you're not going to be able to encode anything to natively take up the entire screen without distortion. The iPhone does have a "zoom" feature (just double-tap on the screen when watching a video), so you have the choice of letterboxing or pillarboxing (depending on the original aspect ratio) or cropping off the edges in order to make the video fill the screen.

The 1.5:1 aspect ratio was likely chosen as a compromise between the two common aspect ratios, so that you could watch full-screen video with minimal cropping in either case. To be fair, it's not nearly as bad as trying to watch 4:3 content on a 16:9 screen, or vice-versa, so it's a very good compromise, in fact.

As for the preferred resolution, if you are only going to watch your content on the iPhone screen, I would recommend going with 576x320 (or thereabouts) for 16:9 content, and 480x360 (or thereabouts) for 4:3 content. This will provide maximum possible resolution on the iPhone's 480x320 screen for both types of content, particularly when watching it "zoomed" (ie, with edges cropped off).

That having been said, you may want to encode in 640x480 or 854x480 (anamorphic) regardless, as this will give you much more output capabilities if you do eventually decide to connect your iPhone to a TV or watch your content on your computer.
 

Sparkee

New member
Joined
Nov 18, 2005
Messages
5,705
Points
0
Location
Saskatchewan, Canada
Even though you are using a preset for 640x480 most software will adjust these settings to keep the proper aspect ratio. For example a 16:9 TV show encoded at 640x480 will result in roughly a 640x350 resolution.
 
Top