Just what happens to the 6GB on the classic?

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5billion

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So, I have an 80GB classic, and on iTunes, it says the capacity is 74.2GB and I'm sitting there going "What the hell.. Vista alone isn't even 6GB.."
Surely, the operating system on the iPod can't be 6GB?! Even the other stuff that comes on the iPod when you first look at it (games, iPod settings, languages etc) can't total up to 6GB.
Could someone please tell me what's happened to it?
 

paranoidxe

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computers read 1MB as 1,048,576 bytes....manufacturers read 1MB as 1,000,000 bytes..theres your difference..your 80GB didn't disappear..its there.

My 500GB HD is actually 465GB by computer standards.
 

iPr0n

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Indeed.

This question gets posted a lot. I've prepared a more detailed explanation:

My "80 gig" Classic has a capacity of

79,824,453,632 bytes
You could call that 80 billion if you round it off... or "80 gigabytes". That's the optimistic number that's advertised. And it's certainly true to within 0.2 % accuracy.

However, this is displayed as 74.3 GB on most lists on the computer.

Computers display memory capacities in GB (also pronounced gigabytes unfortunately) but they are based on quantities of 1024 chunks instead of 1000. "1024" is a round number in the electronic computer world of circuits, whereas "1000" is convenient in human usage.

So 1 KB = 1024 bytes (not "kilo" as in 1000) - a 2% discrepancy
1 MB = 1024x1024 (instead of "mega" as in 1000x1000) - a 5% discrepancy
1 GB = 1024x1024x1024 (instead of "giga" as in 1000x1000x1000) a 7% discrepancy

As you can see, by the time we're into gigs, there's a 7% discrepancy between the actual number of bytes, and the abbreviated GB form.

When we get into "terra", we'll have a 9% discrepancy.

1 TB = 1024x1024x1024x1024 (instead of "terra" as in 1000x1000x1000x1000)

I hope all this doesn't confuse more than it helps. The bottom line is, the units of measure are different depending on where you see them, what the background of the person is (computer/techie or normal), and which interpretation is most advantageous to advertisers.

You're not getting ripped off. Sure, the total capacity appears diminished by 7% if you look at the GB statistics. But on the plus side, your "used space" will appear similarly reduced by 7% no matter how much you store.
 
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eliteshotta

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iPr0n
tanks or the detailed info
that cleared up some questions i had

u know, they realy should have a UNIVERSAL way of maesuring these things
 

__redruM

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The 1 billion byte giga-byte is and always has been a marketing tool for hard drive manufacturers to inflate their capacities. :shake:
 
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Yes, those of us who have been around in the computer industry for a while will remember when the problem began back in the late eighties... One hard drive manufacturer started using the base-10 measurement where 1MB = 1,000,000 bytes. Of course, all of the other manufacturers had to start using the same system in order to keep up, and we ended up in the mess we're in now.

(By contrast, my first 10MB hard drive back in 1985 actually was 10MB, or 1,048,576 bytes).

A new nomenclature has been proposed where the terms Gigabyte (GB), Megabyte (MB), and Kilobyte (KB) would continue to use the base-10 measurements (1 KB = 1,000 bytes), and the base-2 measurements would be expressed using Gibibyte (GiB), Mibibyte (MiB) and Kibibyte (KiB) (such that (1 KiB = 1,024 bytes), but unfortunately this does not yet seem to have caught on beyond use by a few small software developers.
 

musichound

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And you really can't fault Apple or the other DAP manufacturers. This all comes down to the way the manufactureres of the hard drive themselves represent the product. I am all for having this all changed so people can purchase the capacity they expect it to be. As a computer professional this comes as no surprise but to the average consumers I cannot blame them for thinking they wer ripped off.
 
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