Is anyone else going to buy an iTV?

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LukeA

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I am going to buy one of these as soon as they come out.

-Wireless networking

-Ethernet networking

-HDMI out

-Component Out

-USB (not quite sure why)

-Optical Audio Out

-Internal Power Supply












Pics lifted from Engadget and rehosted for posterity.

I wish my HTR had two HDMI in ports, so I guess I'll need to use Component (still good) with this device.

*I now notice that it works with Windows too. I think.*
 
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I probably would except for the fact that I already have a Mac Mini Duo Core serving much the same purpose (with FrontRow) and more.

In my case, the Mini does more than the iTV would, since it also serves as a DVD player (and writer), and a PVR (using EyeTV and a Miglia TVMax).

I might consider getting an iTV for my TV in the bedroom, but I haven't really given that much thought yet....
 

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jhollington said:
I probably would except for the fact that I already have a Mac Mini Duo Core serving much the same purpose (with FrontRow) and more.

In my case, the Mini does more than the iTV would, since it also serves as a DVD player (and writer), and a PVR (using EyeTV and a Miglia TVMax).

I might consider getting an iTV for my TV in the bedroom, but I haven't really given that much thought yet....
I'd like to hear more about that set-up. Can you use the TV as a monitor and do all that from the screen?

I had been trying to envision something like that before iTV was announced. And even with iTV, it seems like your method is better. iTV sounds cool, but it's basically a device to translate from the computer to your TV. It seems like your computer should be able to do this anyway. I mean my iPod can. I'd like to think my computer is a little more sophisticated. ;)

Also I don't really see myself buying too many movies from iTunes. Paying near-DVD prices for near-DVD quality and having none of the portability nor the extras of that come with DVD seems like a bad deal. So I more envisioned ripping all my DVDs to the computer so that I could have a DVD Jukebox-type set-up. But it seemed like doing all of this via my iMac and continuing to use it for all my other computing needs could really tax it, so I was wondering if a dedicated Media machine might be the way to go.

Also on a Mac-related podcast I heard the other day, they were questioning the ability to stream video using the current wireless standards. They seemed to think that Apple was counting on the next wireless protocol being up and running by then (N?) because pulling in video using current wireless technology would not give the near-DVD quality that Apple suggests.

So I don't know. If I can do all of what I want with my current Mac-- store and serve up my music and movies and possibly run some sort of DVR-type programming -- then the $200 iTV would be a cheap way of porting that to my Television, but if that's too much of strain on my system, or the streaming capabilities aren't there, then I may go the Mac Mini route.
 
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Well, in my case I don't have any other type of desktop Mac system, as my computer is a Powerbook, and my wife uses an iBook. I'm probably going to get a Mac Pro sometime in the future, but that's another story.

Therefore, using an iTV and streaming from a computer that may not always be hooked up or available isn't really a viable solution for me.

My TV is an LCD projector, so with the Mac Mini, all I really needed was a 50ft DVI cable to make the run from the front of the room (where the Mini is) to the projector (which is suspended from the ceiling at the back). However, you can also buy a $20 DVI->S-Video adapter from Apple that will allow you to output S-Video. I originally ordered the adapter with the Mini, but of course slapped myself on the forehead as I was setting it up and just ran the 50ft DVI cable (that I already had) right to the back of the Mini, as the output quality was much better that way.

(The advantage to the S-Video adapter would be switching between my cable receiver and the Mac mini, but as it is I can just program my universal remote to change the projector inputs just as easily).

With my Bluetooth keyboard and mouse, I can actually use the Mac Mini as a normal computer (with a 120" screen to boot : ) ), although that's not how I normally use it. Rather, the new Mac Minis come with an infrared remote control, so it wasn't too difficult to program the remote control commands in to my universal remote (a Harmony 890).

The only real problem is that the EyeTV setup only supports analog channels in Canada (I could buy a DVB adapter, but there simply aren't enough digital or HDTV clear-to-air channels up here to make that worthwhile). I therefore still use my cable provider's box for most of my normal TV viewing, and it also includes a PVR. Content that I want to archive and/or encode for my iPod is either recorded directly (if it's analog) or recorder and re-transferred from my cable box (if it's from a digital channel).

The remote control is somewhat limited, but it can perform most of the important tasks without the need for a keyboard. Front Row, of course, offers most of the functionality that the iTV will (iTunes music, videos, iPhoto slideshows, and DVD playback), and can stream audio/video/photo content from my Powerbook or my wife's iBook shared iTunes/iPhoto libraries (as long as they're connected and turned on at the same).

EyeTV 2.3 (the most recent version) now also provides a full-screen menu system to navigate channels, an electronic program guide (EPG), and schedule and view recordings. EyeTV even includes the option to automatically transcode to iPod after recording (although I seldom use that option unless it's a one-off type of thing that I'm going to erase, as I generally prefer to edit the commercials out first).

Lastly, the Mac Mini gives me a platform for converting DVDs to my iPod, since being duo core it performs quite well, and it's usually sitting around in the daytime doing nothing.
 
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