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how to use handbrake?

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Jesse Hollington

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Your best bet is to start by taking a look through our tutorials:

About iPod and iPhone Video Formats and Display Resolutions

iPod/iPhone Video Conversion (Mac)

iPod/iPhone Video Conversion (Windows)

Managing Videos in iTunes

As for the second question, TV Shows purchased from the iTunes Store cannot be burned to a DVD or played on any device other than a computer running iTunes or an iPod, iPhone or Apple TV. If you want to watch purchased videos on your TV, your only real option is to look at either an Apple TV or ways to connect your iPod to your TV -- these methods range from $50 AV cables to full-featured $400 docks.
 
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gonewiththesin said:
i have asked this before with no success in being able to rip my tv show dvds to my computer to be able to add them to my ipod touch.

can somebody please tell me how, i have tried dvd drcrypter and handbrake, but with no success.


EDIT: i have bought some tv shows episodes from the itunes store, and i would like to know if its possible to burn them to be able to watch on my tv?

Don't cross post topics when you have additional questions on the same topic and need help.

When ripping a DVD you will have .VOB files when the rip is completed.
If you haven't downloaded the current version of Handbrake (0.9.1 - windows GUI version) then do so here: http://handbrake.fr/?article=download

Option one:
-You can then put your DVD in the drive and load it in Handbrake. Use the iPod settings for low or high res then just wait for it to finish. You do not have to rip the DVD to convert it using the current version of Handbrake.

Option two:
-If you want to rip the movie first then with DVD Decrypter or DVD Shrink rip the whole movie since this may be easier for you. The movie & audio are contained in the .VOB files. Set DVD Decrypter under "Mode" to "File". Then set the location that you want the files to go to then start the rip. This option is good if you have more than one DVD to convert.

You can see the Handbrake tutorial written by baggss & linked on the guide above. It's step-by-step with pictures:

How to rip a movie with mediafolk (aka Handbrake)
http://www.phoppe.com/HB/movie/movie.html

How to rip tv shows with mediafolk (Handbrake)
http://www.phoppe.com/HB/tv/tv.html
 

atreyu

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As far as I can tell all the tips & articles posted so far in this thread create videos that are no more than 640 pixels wide, and use only about 360 lines of the available 480 lines of resolution on your iPod (for 16:9 content). However, the iPod 6G & Nano 3G support "anamorphic" encodes of up to 720x576, which means they output "effective resolutions" of up to 1024x576, vs. the maybe 640x352 you get with other methods.

If you plan to play any of your converted videos back on an HDTV or a computer you'll *really* see an improvement using anamorphic encodes, especially if you're using Apple's Component (not Composite) Video cable. For more info on how to do anamorphic iPod encodes with Handbrake see my recent post.

If, however, you plan to play your converted back exclusively on your iPod's screen I'd advise against anamorphic encoding... instead use the methods listed earlier in this thread, and choose the "iPod Lo-Rez" preset.
 
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gonewiththesin

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i finally got handbrake and dvd45 to work and i got it to rip superbad and it works perfect.

now i wanna know what do i do when i want to rip tv shows from store bought dvds?
 

baggss

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gonewiththesin said:
i finally got handbrake and dvd45 to work and i got it to rip superbad and it works perfect.

now i wanna know what do i do when i want to rip tv shows from store bought dvds?
The same thing, just use the Handbrake queue to set up multiple episodes at once.
 

wetjet550

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Ya'all are making this way too hard. :mad:

1. Use dvd decrypter to export your multiple vob files from your dvd to say... c:\movietitle\VIDEO_TS

2. Open a command prompt in administrator mode, go to the path of where you exported your vob files using dvd decrypter... ( cd c:\movietitle\video_ts )

3. type " copy /B title1.vob+title2.vob+title3.vob+title4.vob movie.vob )

of course, you'll have to rename the "title1.vob" to whatever your vob's file name is. Say I decrypt a dvd, and I get 6 vob files named VTS_03_1.VOB through VTS_03_6.VOB. I would type: " copy /B VTS_03_1.VOB+VTS_03_2.VOB+VTS_03_3.VOB+VTS_03_4.VOB+VTS_03_5.VOB+VTS_03_6.VOB finalmovie.vob"

you can name "finalmovie.vob" to whatever you want.

Delete the smaller vob files, as you wont need them any more. Use handbrake to open the finalmovie.vob file.

Problem solved.
 

Sparkee

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I think using the command line is also harder than it needs to be in this day and age. Beside ripping movies and using Handbrake have come a long ways since this thread was stared 3-4 years ago.
 

dutchie

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Handbrake 2-pass encoding

I have an iPod Classic (7th gen.) and converted my DVDs on Ancient Egypt by means of Handbrake (best converter available!). I used the "iPod" setting and deleted the subtitles. That's all and the results are very good.
I started reading about the "2-pass encoding" option and got conflicting opinions. Some say that it does not make any difference on the small iPod screen, other say just the opposite.
Anybody out there who has an opinion based on fact? I know it takes a little longer for the conversion, but if the difference is noticeable I would not mind. Once again: I ONLY use the converted M4V-files on my iPod Classic, NOT on a TV, etc.
Thanks much!
 

Jesse Hollington

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The short answer is that the benefits from two-pass encoding actually depend largely on the source material, which is probably why you're seeing such conflicting opinions.

All video compression algorithms in common use today are inherently "lossy", since encoding each individual frame for even a standard-definition video would produce files that ranged around 150MB per minute of video (based on 640x480 resolution, 16-bit colour and 30fps). Lossy video compression works on the principle of taking reference frames and then calculating and encoding the differences between each frame. Less data is therefore required to encode videos that have very little motion ("talking head" newscasts and interviews for example), than for videos with a lot of changing scenes (e.g. action movies). The amount of data required for each second of video is referred to as the "bit-rate."

Two-pass encoding provides advantages in many cases by figuring out the optimal bit-rate to be used for every different portion of the video. This is most advantageous for movies, where portions may tend to vary widely between relatively still scenes that don't require a high bit-rate to encode versus scenes with flying spaceships, sword-fights, and explosions, where things are actually moving very quickly.

Two-pass encoding will not provide any increase in the actual quality of the video from a resolution point of view, but it will usually provide smoother video with less "artifacting" and other glitches often seen in high-motion sequences.

The bottom line is that if all of your encoding are documentary DVDs on Ancient Egypt, there's a good chance that two-pass encoding will be a waste of time for you. You can of course re-convert one and do a comparison on your own to see if you notice any differences, but I'm willing to bet that any differences would be so barely noticeable as to make it not worth the additional time and effort.
 
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