hearing loss & volume control on ipod Shuffle

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javabird

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I read the article on hearing loss, but it left me with a few questions:

Is there any way to “limit the volume” on an iPod Shuffle?

Also, if you limit the volume of a song in the iTunes library, does that override the manual volume control button if you turn it up all the way on the iPod?
 

mdmania

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I use mp3gain and I have all my songs set at 90db levels. The way I maintain my level and protecting my ear is making sure that I hear enough sound from outside source while still able to listen to my music comfortably.
 

javabird

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I guess my question should have been more specific.

The article says you can "limit the volume" by selecting that option in iTunes get-info for the song (i.e., limit to 40%). I am wondering if turning up the volume controls manually overrides this.

Also, am I correct in assuming the "limit the volume" control on the iPod can only be done on an iPod with a screen, not on a Shuffle?
 

zip22

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limiting the volume to overcome your desire to blow your ears out? if you know not to listen too loud, i would think you could monitor that yourself.
 

javabird

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Huh. Interesting reply.

If you read the article to which I referred, you will note that that problem is it is difficult to know how loud you have the volume if you are in a noisy place (i.e., bus depot, etc.): http://www.ilounge.com/index.php/articles/comments/listen-safely-your-ears-and-your-ipod/

The article says there is a way to "limit the volume." My question is, how do you do that, since there is only an "up" or "down" button on the Shuffle controls???
 

dnd

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You could try some of the isolating headphones like the e3c/e4c/er4p

They dramatiacally reduce external noise and consequently the level at which you have to lisen to your player

I'm shocked at the number of people in my gym flashing the latest iPod around yet still using the stock earphones to overcome the sound of the gym/gym music - madness...

..then again I think most of these newbies would be shocked at paying almost as much as the iPod they've just bought for a pair of isolating headphones
 

zip22

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the only mentions of 'limit' in that article are here

By limiting outside sound, the inside sounds can then be heard at quieter levels.
you should carefully limit the amount of time you spend listening to your iPod at high volumes.
If you live in Europe, and have purchased an iPod there, you’ll be protected from the most serious damage - iPods sold in Europe are limited to 100 dB. However, many people have applied a simple hack to remove this limit, letting their iPods jump up to 130 dB again. Think carefully about doing this; listening to the iPod at maximum volume is a sure-fire way to harm your ears, and the volume limit is there for your protection.
no where does it say 'there is a way to "limit the volume."'.

if you read the comments, someone does ask if you can apply the eu volume limit, and there is a suggestion, but no guarantee that it still works like it did.

Does anyone know of a way to limit the iPod’s output level for non-European iPods? I try to be responsible about my listening levels but this sounds like a good extra safety measure.

By bwahahax on 12.24.05 at 09:35 PM

I would be interested how to limit the volume like in the European iPod too.

By mopar212000 on 12.25.05 at 08:26 AM

For older, non-European iPods, the solution is usually to download a European iPod Firmware updater. (I’ve never tried this, though I’ve thought seriously about it since my hearing started being affected.)

By yarudora on 12.25.05 at 09:05 AM


either way, the eu volume limit does not mean you won't damage your ears, its just not as bad as it could be. it is limited to 100dB, which if you read before,

Under OSHA standards, workers can only be exposed to ... 100 dB for 2 hours ... many hearing professionals say these guidelines are not strict enough
 

javabird

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Sorry, you're correct, it was a user comment that referred to "limiting the volume. " The article said: "We’d strongly recommend that you listen at the 40% or below level with headphones attached whenever possible."

Same question, though: how do you do this on a Shuffle?
 

dnd

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Well, as there is no volume indicator - you can't - or am I just being stupid?

Has anybody on this forum got any common sense?

Tip - just turn it down when you ears start to bleed
 

frisk291

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After reading this thread a couple times, I think the OP's problem is he might be listening to the shuffle in a noisy area and wants to make sure that when he turns up the volume to drown out the noise, it's not so loud that it'll damage his ears. Since there's no volume indicator on the shuffle, when you're in a noisy area and you turn up the volume, you don't know exactly how loud it is until you go into a quiet room or something, so I think it might be pretty easy to damage your hearing in this situation. I really don't know of any way to limit the volume of songs within the shuffle itself but like dnd said, I'd recommend some canalphones. That way you can block out the outside noise and get better sound quality too. :)
 

javabird

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frisk291 said:
After reading this thread a couple times, I think the OP's problem is he might be listening to the shuffle in a noisy area and wants to make sure that when he turns up the volume to drown out the noise, it's not so loud that it'll damage his ears. Since there's no volume indicator on the shuffle, when you're in a noisy area and you turn up the volume, you don't know exactly how loud it is until you go into a quiet room or something, so I think it might be pretty easy to damage your hearing in this situation. I really don't know of any way to limit the volume of songs within the shuffle itself but like dnd said, I'd recommend some canalphones. That way you can block out the outside noise and get better sound quality too. :)
Thanks for your thoughtful reply. I commute on a noisy bus, and you can't trust your ears to know when the volume exceeds a safe level (120-130 decibels).
 

frisk291

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Yeah I have the same problem because I use my shuffle in the gym a lot where it gets pretty noisy. Although I recommended canalphones to you, I don't use them because I've never been able to find a pair that fit right. However, my brother uses his Shure e3c's (canalphones) in the gym all the time and loves them because all of the surrounding noise is blocked out and he can focus better on his workout. Hopefully you can find a solution to your problem whether it's in the shuffle itself or in finding a new pair of noise isolating headphones.
 

progshim

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preset volume levels

Yes there is a way to preset the volume level of your music. in iTunes, right click on the title of a song, choose "Get Info". this will open a dialog box where you can set volume, rating, even EQ settings. is that what you were asking?
 

progshim

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sorry i forgot.... when you get the dialog box, click the "Options" tab.
 

javabird

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Re: preset volume levels

progshim said:
Yes there is a way to preset the volume level of your music. in iTunes, right click on the title of a song, choose "Get Info". this will open a dialog box where you can set volume, rating, even EQ settings. is that what you were asking?
Yeah, I guess I wasn't clear in the original post. I'm aware of how to do this, but I was wondering if the manual control would override this.

For example, if you use this method to set the volume at 40% on a song in iTunes, then on the iPod iyou turn the manual volume up to the maximum--does it only play at 40%?
 

frisk291

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You could do a test run without putting the earbuds in your ears so you won't damage your hearing. If the music ends up sounding ridiculously loud, which is probably more than 40%, then you probably can manually override what you did in iTunes.
 

progshim

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preset volume

no, the manual volume control doesnt override the preset. the preset overrides the manual volume control.
 
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