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Topic: Extreme volume fluctuation (120gb Classic)

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Old 03-11-2009, 02:00 AM
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Junior Lounger
 
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Extreme volume fluctuation (120gb Classic)

I have just noticed tonight that from track to track there is a VERY extreme fluctuation in volume. This is only noticeable through headphones, when I listen to the ipod in my car you can't really tell. I don't think it is the tracks, because these are tracks that were taken from an old ipod and copied right over.

I tried enabling sound check, and while it does help, there is still quite a large gap between volumes, and it also makes the songs alot quieter.

Is this a known issue, or does anyone have any suggestions?
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Old 03-11-2009, 06:54 AM
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Believe it or not, the problem is with the tracks. Studios often dynamically compress their music and use volumes at around -100dB. A different artist will come out with an album at -96dB. I wouldn't use sound check though.

Check out what you can do with MP3Gain (which will also work with AAC files) or ReplayGain. It would actually be best if you reduce the volume of all your files down to -89dB. This would help reduce the affects of clipping (caused by dynamic compression) and ensure that every track in your library is at the same volume. You can use higher values such as -98-99dB if you want things louder but MP3Gain and ReplayGain were made to reduce the volume. It is better to turn up the device rather than turn up your music.



64GB iPhone 5 | 64GB iPad mini | AppleTV 2 (2012) | AppleTV 2 (2010) | 4GB 3G iPod shuffle | 2012 15" MacBook Pro, 1TB SSHD, 16GB DDR3 1600 MHz, OS X 10.8.4 Mountain Lion | Apple Lossless | iTunes AAC -Q 68 | iTunes 11.1 | Library size = 1.78TB | Legacy iPods: 3G 40GB, 4G 40GB, 5G 60GB, 160GB iPod classic (2009)
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Old 03-11-2009, 07:16 AM
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that is strange that you say that. What is the reasoning that the tracks aren't that quiet on an older 3G ipod (same exact tracks, just copied off through idump) are very quiet on the new classic?
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Old 03-11-2009, 01:00 PM
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Different iPods perform differently. What you could do is reduce (or increase) the volume of every track to 99dB. Then see if the iPod classic still has volume issues. Another thing is that you need to conduct a blind test between the 3G iPod and iPod classic. You see, volume levels on the older iPods don't match up to newer ones. In other words, filling up the volume bar 1/4 of the way on the 3G iPod produces different results than setting an iPod classic to the same visual volume (ie 1/4 of the way). You would need to test two iPods using line-level output. Additionally, I would have to conduct research to see if the 3G iPod produces the same volume (through its line-out) as the iPod classic.

I am still willing to bet that the songs are the problem here. ReplayGain (you will have to convert this to Sound Check values) or MP3Gain will fix your problem. As I said, you would be better off reducing all of your tracks to -89dB and just turning your iPod up.



64GB iPhone 5 | 64GB iPad mini | AppleTV 2 (2012) | AppleTV 2 (2010) | 4GB 3G iPod shuffle | 2012 15" MacBook Pro, 1TB SSHD, 16GB DDR3 1600 MHz, OS X 10.8.4 Mountain Lion | Apple Lossless | iTunes AAC -Q 68 | iTunes 11.1 | Library size = 1.78TB | Legacy iPods: 3G 40GB, 4G 40GB, 5G 60GB, 160GB iPod classic (2009)
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Old 03-11-2009, 04:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kornchild2002
Different iPods perform differently. What you could do is reduce (or increase) the volume of every track to 99dB. Then see if the iPod classic still has volume issues. Another thing is that you need to conduct a blind test between the 3G iPod and iPod classic. You see, volume levels on the older iPods don't match up to newer ones. In other words, filling up the volume bar 1/4 of the way on the 3G iPod produces different results than setting an iPod classic to the same visual volume (ie 1/4 of the way). You would need to test two iPods using line-level output. Additionally, I would have to conduct research to see if the 3G iPod produces the same volume (through its line-out) as the iPod classic.

I am still willing to bet that the songs are the problem here. ReplayGain (you will have to convert this to Sound Check values) or MP3Gain will fix your problem. As I said, you would be better off reducing all of your tracks to -89dB and just turning your iPod up.
I see. Is there an advantage to using one of those 3rd party programs as opposed to using the volume booster/reducer in itunes?

EDIT: Oh, let me see if i have this right. Itunes amplifies the tracks based on %, so even if i boost all of them to 100%, they will only be increased relative to their old volume, and thus the fluctuation will still exist? As opposed to both of the programs you mentioned actually changing the track's dB's? Let me know if i have this right or theres something else i'm missing.

Last edited by spyro415; 03-11-2009 at 04:24 PM.
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Old 03-11-2009, 05:25 PM
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I think you are right in your assumption there. Additionally, the 3rd party programs can produce results that are compatible with other hardware/software (mainly MP3Gain). I can use MP3Gain to reduce (or increase) the volume of an mp3/AAC file. I can then playback that file on my PS3, Xbox 360, Wii, soon to be DSi, PSP, car CD deck, PDA, or iPod. The volume will be increased (or reduced, depending on what I did) on all of those devices. Those other programs actually look at and change the dB levels the songs play at. ReplayGain gives one the ability to adjust the dB level more so than MP3Gain. With MP3Gain, the dB level can be increased/decreased in increments of 0.5dB while ReplayGain doesn't have increments like that. The bad thing about ReplayGain is that you would have to convert the values to Sound Check values in order for your iPod (and iTunes) to work with the newly adjusted volume.



64GB iPhone 5 | 64GB iPad mini | AppleTV 2 (2012) | AppleTV 2 (2010) | 4GB 3G iPod shuffle | 2012 15" MacBook Pro, 1TB SSHD, 16GB DDR3 1600 MHz, OS X 10.8.4 Mountain Lion | Apple Lossless | iTunes AAC -Q 68 | iTunes 11.1 | Library size = 1.78TB | Legacy iPods: 3G 40GB, 4G 40GB, 5G 60GB, 160GB iPod classic (2009)
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Old 03-11-2009, 05:46 PM
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Junior Lounger
 
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ah i see, i hadn't thought of that. Thanks for the help, ill give mp3gain a try.
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Topic: Extreme volume fluctuation (120gb Classic)

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